ABAM Certification

Buprenorphine Post
MChaplin
Posts: 183

Postby MChaplin » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

Fishdoc- fantastic!

fishdoc
Posts: 111

Postby fishdoc » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

Test results are out. I passed. How did everyone else do?

entjwb
Posts: 180

Postby entjwb » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

I would agree with M Kaylor. I took the test Saturday and felt fairly well. I agree the review course I attended in July and being able to review on line was helpful. But when you take 250 questions over 5 hours. It is difficult to really know how you did. I also think it was a fair test but without the review course and reading Essentials would have been hard. I also read a lot of Principles of Addiction Medicine also. In the areas I felt I needed more details.

drpasser
Posts: 1404

Postby drpasser » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

Good for you for sitting for that exam. I thought the exam was fair too.

:-)

m_kaylor
Posts: 22

Postby m_kaylor » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

I took the exam last Saturday. It seemed like a fair test. I had read the essentials twice and have work in an inpatient and residential treatment setting as well as an opiate treatment center but when I took the practice test (I think it is marketed as BEST) I realized I wasn't as prepared as I thought. I then took the review course online and felt much better. The review course was spot on with the topics and level of knowledge the test was looking for. Lots of questions about genetics, neurotransmitter pathways and public health that I wouldn't have known without the review course. That being said, the pass rate for first time takers is 87% so you could probably go in and do well with a lot less effort.

entjwb
Posts: 180

Postby entjwb » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

They have requirements to qualify to take the test. I think it is 1980 hours involved in addiction medicine. ASAM will give you the breakdown on how many hours are in direct patient care and I think 50 hours CME. I got both the Principles and Essentials of Addiction Medicine to read. I would suggest if going to do it get the books now. There is a discount if ASAM member. Next year may be the last year you could qualify for that pathway.

NoDrugs4u
Posts: 198

Postby NoDrugs4u » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

Thank you each, and Good Luck entjwb!

The Osteopathic pathway to "Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ)" (that's what the DO's use for addiction certification) has been discontinued for Family Practice physicians. So, short of taking an entire residency in Internal Medicine or Psychiatry, absurd at my age, there is no reasonable Osteopathic pathway for Addiction certification.

Per the ABAM website and email, they have applied for ABMS (enough with the acronyms!) recognition. It appears that they do allow DO's to test, but I fear that if the ABMS gets involved that this pathway will also close to DO's.

The reason that I want/need to get certified is that to be the director of an outpatient clinic in my state one needs to be "certified" in addiction medicine by either the "ASAM", or CAQ in addiction Psychiatry (MD), or CAQ in addiction medicine by appropriate board (DO).

tstinson
Posts: 16

Postby tstinson » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

I took and passed the ABAM exam last November. I took the ASAM prep course and studied****iduously, but did not find the exam questions particularly difficult. For those who are considering it, one factor is that the minimum passing score is quite low (more than 2 standard deviations below the mean). I am not sure whether having the ABAM certificate per se is worth anything and I am fairly sure that the ABAM (like the American Board of Pain Medicine before it) will not be able to gain entry into the American Board of Medical Specialists short of establishing and requiring a full residency in Addiction Medicine as a qualification for certification. The main value of the certificate is probably as evidence that one has passed a reasonably rigorous certification exam in case one's competence to practice in this area is questioned by insurance companies or medical licensure authorities. If an ABMS-member Board should enter the fray with a subspecialty certificate requiring residency/fellowship training and their primary certification, they would probably get the nod over the ABAM as the legitimate certification in Addiction Medicine. So far, no such board has emerged; however, the American Board of Anesthesiology has used this mechanism to get into authority over other new fields, such as Sleep Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pain Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Care Medicine, none of which is closer to anesthesiology than is Addiction Medicine.

MChaplin
Posts: 183

Postby MChaplin » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

as an MD, I can't speak to the DO issue, but The exam is hard- I studied many hours on my own- read the principles of addiction medicine cover to cover and did multiple practice tests because i didn't want to invest in the review course- I passed with a fairly safe margin, but I struggled- lots of basic science and a fair amount of emergency medicine which as a psychiatrist, i had to learn/relearn (i finished internship in 1989....I think the review course is better because it is primed to the exam.....when i recert, I will probably s--- it up and take it- on the positive side, I found the process well worth doing. the yearly recertification is not hard but fair warning it is expensive- abam plus asam dues is close to 1000 annually....

entjwb
Posts: 180

Postby entjwb » Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:34 am

I am taking the exam tomorrow. I am a MD but think it is open to DO as well. But you can get certified as Addictionist thru DO route. I would advise doing the review course as well as reading the Principles and Essentials text. The exam includes all types of addiction not just opiates. I started reading and reviewing 3 months ago but wish I had started 9-12 months earlier.


Return to “Clinical Use of Buprenorphine”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests